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THE NEW GENERATION OF PESTICIDES

Azudi

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About

The Bemisia tabaci, also known as the tobacco whitefly, is a highly invasive species that poses a significant global challenge in the field of agriculture. It infests approximately 1000 plant hosts and causes substantial crop losses. The tobacco whitefly is particularly destructive due to its ability to transmit numerous plant viruses and its capacity to develop resistance against various pesticides.

One of the major impacts of Bemisia tabaci is the damage it causes to plants. Infested plants often exhibit chlorosis, which is the yellowing of leaves due to nutrient deficiencies. The whitefly also secretes honeydew, a sugary substance that serves as a substrate for fungal growth. This promotes the development of sooty mold and other fungal diseases, further compromising plant health. Additionally, the whitefly's feeding behavior directly affects plant vigor and productivity, resulting in reduced crop yields and quality.

Another significant concern is the role of Bemisia tabaci as a vector for plant viruses. This whitefly species is capable of transmitting a wide range of viruses to susceptible plants. Crops such as tomatoes, cotton, cassava, and cucurbits are particularly vulnerable to viral infections spread by the tobacco whitefly. The transmission of these viruses can lead to severe disease outbreaks, further exacerbating crop losses and posing challenges for disease management strategies.

One of the key challenges in controlling Bemisia tabaci is its ability to develop resistance to pesticides. This pest has shown a remarkable capacity to adapt and become resistant to various chemical treatments commonly used in agriculture. This resistance poses a significant obstacle for effective pest management and necessitates the development of alternative control strategies, such as integrated pest management (IPM) approaches that combine multiple tactics.

To combat the destructive impact of Bemisia tabaci, professionals in the field of agriculture and pest management need to stay updated on the life cycle and identification of the whitefly. Understanding its appearance, behavior, and preferred hosts can aid in early detection and targeted control measures. Additionally, knowledge of the economic impact of Bemisia tabaci infestations and the mechanisms of viral transmission is crucial for implementing preventive measures and developing effective management strategies. Finally, staying informed about the development of pesticide resistance in Bemisia tabaci populations is essential for adopting sustainable pest control practices that minimize the risk of resistance and ensure long-term management success.

The Technology: Exploiting Chaperonins in Endosymbionts for Innovative Insecticide Development

Chaperonins, essential proteins found in all organisms, play a crucial role in catalyzing the refolding of newly synthesized proteins. Meanwhile, pests like Bemisia tabaci harbor endosymbionts, microorganisms vital for their development and survival. Recognizing the significance of chaperonins in endosymbionts, we propose an innovative solution: leveraging chaperonins as targets for designing new synthetic insecticides to control agricultural pests.

Our product, Azudi (NCDSA), is a novel synthetic Azauracil derivative specifically developed to inhibit GroEL chaperonins present in endosymbionts associated with Bemisia tabaci. Notably, the primary endosymbiont Portiera aleyrodidarum is a potential target. By targeting the chaperonins, we aim to disrupt the crucial protein-folding process within the endosymbionts, thereby compromising the development and survival of Bemisia tabaci.

In our ex vivo studies, Azudi has demonstrated significant efficacy against Bemisia tabaci. Within a 24 to 72-hour period, the mortality rate of the whitefly increased from 60% to 85%. This promising result highlights the potential of Azudi as an effective tool for controlling Bemisia tabaci populations.

By specifically targeting chaperonins in endosymbionts, our approach offers a novel mechanism for insecticide development with broader applications in agricultural systems. The innovative use of synthetic compounds like Azudi opens up new avenues for pest control, moving beyond conventional pesticides. This concept holds the potential to revolutionize the way we combat agricultural pests and mitigate crop losses caused by highly invasive species like Bemisia tabaci.

As we continue to refine and develop this concept, further research and field trials will be necessary to assess the efficacy, environmental impact, and practical implementation of Azudi as an insecticide. However, the initial results are promising, and our solution holds the potential to provide a sustainable and effective means of managing Bemisia tabaci and potentially other pest species with endosymbionts dependent on chaperonin-mediated processes.

Azudi Achievements

Our team has achieved a significant milestone in our research and development efforts by submitting a provisional patent application titled "Azauracil Derivatives for Controlling Pests" to the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). This patent application encompasses 13 claims that cover the utilization of various Azauracil derivatives, including the active compound, for pest control purposes and as insecticidal compounds specifically targeting Bemisia tabaci.

The application not only addresses the use of Azauracil derivatives in controlling pests but also explores the synthesis pathways of these derivatives for potential commercial applications. By examining the methods of synthesis, we aim to establish a solid foundation for the production and utilization of Azauracil derivatives as effective insecticides in the agricultural industry.

Furthermore, we are proud to announce that we have entered into an agreement with TRDC-RAMOT (TAU)-GADOT Agro to conduct and fully sponsor the proof of concept field tests. This collaboration will enable us to validate the efficacy and practicality of our innovation in real-world agricultural settings. By partnering with TRDC-RAMOT (TAU)-GADOT Agro, we gain access to their expertise, resources, and extensive network, which will greatly contribute to the successful execution of our field tests.

This achievement demonstrates our commitment to advancing scientific research and innovation in the field of pest control. Through our patent application, we seek to protect our intellectual property and secure exclusive rights to the use of Azauracil derivatives as potent insecticides. Our collaboration with TRDC-RAMOT (TAU)-GADOT Agro further strengthens our position as we move forward with the practical implementation and commercialization of our technology.

We are excited about the potential impact our research may have on the agricultural industry, offering a novel approach to pest management and addressing the challenges posed by pests such as Bemisia tabaci. By developing effective and sustainable solutions, we aim to contribute to global food security and promote environmentally responsible practices in agriculture.

Our product, Azudi (NCDSA), is a novel synthetic Azauracil derivative specifically developed to inhibit GroEL chaperonins present in endosymbionts associated with Bemisia tabaci. Notably, the primary endosymbiont Portiera aleyrodidarum is a potential target. By targeting the chaperonins, we aim to disrupt the crucial protein-folding process within the endosymbionts, thereby compromising the development and survival of Bemisia tabaci.

In our ex vivo studies, Azudi has demonstrated significant efficacy against Bemisia tabaci. Within a 24 to 72-hour period, the mortality rate of the whitefly increased from 60% to 85%. This promising result highlights the potential of Azudi as an effective tool for controlling Bemisia tabaci populations.

By specifically targeting chaperonins in endosymbionts, our approach offers a novel mechanism for insecticide development with broader applications in agricultural systems. The innovative use of synthetic compounds like Azudi opens up new avenues for pest control, moving beyond conventional pesticides. This concept holds the potential to revolutionize the way we combat agricultural pests and mitigate crop losses caused by highly invasive species like Bemisia tabaci.

As we continue to refine and develop this concept, further research and field trials will be necessary to assess the efficacy, environmental impact, and practical implementation of Azudi as an insecticide. However, the initial results are promising, and our solution holds the potential to provide a sustainable and effective means of managing Bemisia tabaci and potentially other pest species with endosymbionts dependent on chaperonin-mediated processes.